Current Consultations



Please note:
The Planning department run a variety of different consultations which can be quite specific and complex. They therefore have their own planning consultation portal which you can search for all planning consultations. Go to the Planning consultation portal.

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Consultation Title Business Group Start Date Completion Date
Click for more detail Resident Reviewers Project: Council Tax e-forms testing - Phase 2 Corporate Services and Housing 04 Oct 2016 04 Oct 2016
Aim

To gather feedback on two Council Tax electronic forms before their introduction to the Council's website (Moving within the borough, Change of Payment).

Results

Generally Reviewers found the majority of questions in the forms understandable. However, the group had a number of suggestions for improvement, including:

 

Help or explanatory text

There are a number of areas of the forms that would benefit from explanatory text; i.e. further explanation of the information required or why it is required (e.g. formats for dates, sort codes and what ‘Advisor ID’ means).

Advisor details

When completing a form on behalf of someone else the form requests ‘Advisor details’ and ‘Advisor ID’. This confused all Reviewers that encountered this question, with all asking how this section was to be completed. This section of the form requires further thought.

Format of sort code and dates fields

Reviewers were annoyed that the sort code field, and some date fields, did not specify the format that was required for the data to be entered (this was particularly true for bank sort codes).

Movement of the screen when data is entered

After entering address information, the screen often moves from where the Reviewer is entering text to the top of the page. This was frustrating to Reviewers who then had to scroll back to where they had been entering data. Reviewers would like to see the screen remain in its previous position to avoid confusion.

Confirmation screen

Reviewers felt the confirmation screen was poorly laid out and unnecessarily long. This meant that Reviewers had to scroll through many screens in order to check the information they had supplied. Improving the layout would be welcomed and will assist residents in checking the information they have added is correct.

 

 

Outcome
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Click for more detail Customer Services for London - Customer Service Centre Exit Survey - 2016 Corporate Services and Housing 03 Oct 2016 28 Oct 2016
Aim

The Customer Services for London Group leads a Customer Services consultation exercise across London boroughs during October each year. The exercise gathers feedback on customers' experience of visiting the Customer Service Centre.

Results
Outcome
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Click for more detail Customer Services Survey Corporate Services and Housing 08 Aug 2016 30 Sep 2016
Aim

The Customer Service Centre is the access point for a wide range of Council services. The Council would like to improve residents experience when interacting with the Customer Services' department.

Results

Devices used - Almost three-quarters (72 per cent) of respondents use a computer or laptop ‘daily’ with 42 per cent of respondents use a tablet ‘daily’. A smartphone was used ‘daily’ by more than three-quarters (78 per cent) of respondents.

Fast track/self service facilities - Around six in ten respondents ‘always’ or ‘often’ use a self-serve checkout (60 per cent), with a similar percentage using self-serve ticket machines at train stations (59 per cent). Less (22 per cent) ‘always’ or ‘often’ pay at the pump for petrol.

Government transactions - At least half of respondents indicated that they would prefer to carry out each of the listed government transactions online (applying for a passport, driving licence, road tax or TV licence). Respondents were most likely (72 per cent) to select ‘online/email’ in response to applying for a TV licence.

Paying for transactions - For the majority of the listed transactions (grocery shopping, mobile phone bills, insurance, driving licence, road tax and TV licence), making payment by a ‘debit/credit card’ was the most selected response. The exception to this was paying for a mobile phone bill, where ‘direct debit’ was the most selected response.

Waiting times

Telephone calls - When asked how long they would be prepared to wait for their call to be answered by the Council if the query could be resolved in one call. Most selected response was ‘longer than 60 seconds’ (35 per cent), followed by ‘up to 60 seconds’ (32 per cent). Although a fifth (20 per cent) would be prepared to wait 30 seconds or less.

Visits to the Customer Service Centre - When asked how long they would be prepared to wait to be seen by a Council advisor in the Customer Service Centre if the query could be resolved in one visit. Most selected response was ‘between 15 and 20 minutes’ (33 per cent), followed by ‘less than 15 minutes’ (31 per cent). Few (eight per cent) were prepared to wait longer than 30 minutes.

Contacting the Council - Respondents were asked for their preferred contact method for a series of Council services. ‘Online’ was the most selected contact method for the majority of services.

Applying for Council services online - Around half of respondents indicated that it was ‘extremely likely’ or ‘likely’ that they would apply for a first time permit online (49 per cent), make changes to their parking permit online (54 per cent) and apply for accessible transport services online (49 per cent).

Preferred method of payment for Council services - Aside from paying for Council Tax, where the most selected preferred payment method was ‘direct debit’, respondents most selected preferred payment method was by ‘debit/credit card’. Almost half of respondents indicated that ‘debit/credit card’ was their preferred method for paying for a resident parking permit (45 per cent), paying a parking fine (48 per cent) and other general Council payments (47 per cent).

Express service area - The majority (60 per cent) of respondents were unaware that they could access Council services online at the ‘Express Service Area’, just over a fifth (22 per cent) were.

Council’s website - Nearly two-thirds (64 per cent) of respondents had used the Council’s website in the last 12 months, almost a quarter (23 per cent) had not.

Outcome

The results will be used to inform Customer Services' department engagement strategy. 

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Click for more detail A new community centre for North Kensington Corporate Services and Housing 07 Jul 2016 26 Nov 2016
Aim

The Wornington Green Estate, owned by Catalyst Housing Ltd (CHL), is undergoing major redevelopment. This includes the creation of new homes and improvements to the local park and play facilities.

The Council owns the freehold to the current community centre which is occupied by the Venture Community Association. The plans involve the demolition of the current community centre (to form part of the new park that is being planned) and the provision of a new community centre on Portobello Road.

Although it will be built by CHL, the Council will be the client for this part of the development and the freehold of the new building will be held by the Council. The new centre will be at least the same size as the current one. The detailed design, size and facilities to be provided in the new centre have not yet been decided, but will be subject to further consultation and a detailed planning application. The existing Centre will not be demolished until the new centre is ready.

The Council is keen to hear the views of stakeholders on what they would like to see offered in the new centre. Therefore a wide ranging consultation is taking place to gether views.

 

Results

Design and services on offer
Within the survey respondents were asked to indicate how important a range of facilities were to have in the new community centre. The majority of respondents rated each of the elements as ‘very important’ or ‘somewhat important’. Those attracting the highest percentage scores were ‘hall for community use/hire’ (89 per cent), ‘room(s) suitable for exercise/dance classes’ (87 per cent) and ‘outside space’ (83 per cent).

The Venture Community Association (VCA) identified ‘two large flexible halls’ as one of their priorities for the new centre. The Wornington Green Resident Steering Group (RSG) were also keen to see a large main hall retained.

Respondents to the survey were also asked to prioritise a list of services and activities. Most selected responses were ‘exercise or dance classes’ (49 per cent), ‘adventure playground’ (40 per cent) and ‘adult education classes’ (38 per cent).

The most mentioned aspects by those attending the events and activities were ‘adventure playground/outdoor play’ (33 comments), ‘sports/sports facilities’ (24 comments) and ‘adult and children’s learning/education’ (19 comments). At the event targeted at children and young people, their top answers were ‘adventure playground’ (20 comments) and ‘sports/sports facilities’ (14 comments).

The VCA also identified ‘learning spaces for adult and children with state of the art technology’ as one of their key priorities for the new centre. They indicate that the current Venture Centre delivers a varied programme of learning that would be enhanced by appropriate facilities and access to new technology.

The RSG were keen to see space dedicated to childcare/crèche, as well as a homework club, computer suite and sewing/craft room.

Outside space
Respondents to the survey were asked how they would like to see outside space utilised in the new centre. Most common responses were for an ‘adventure playground’ (58 per cent) and a ‘community garden’ (49 per cent).

Other uses of the new building
As the new building is likely to contain additional floors, other than the community centre, respondents to the survey were asked to indicate which other uses they would support. Most popular, of the options presented to them, were ‘educational uses’ (58 per cent) and ‘public service uses’ (45 per cent). In their response the VCA feel offices, educational uses or other community uses would complement the community centre.

Outcome

The results of the exercise will inform plans for a new community centre for North Kensington.

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Click for more detail Adult and Family Learning Survey 2015 -16 Corporate Services and Housing 30 Jun 2016 30 Jul 2016
Aim

To gather feedback from those attending an adult or family learning course in the borough.

Results
  • The largest proportion of respondents to the survey had taken part in a learning activity at Westway Development Trust (30 per cent). English and English as a second language were the most common courses.
  • To learn a skill (52 per cent), learn more about the subject (50 per cent), meet other people (38 per cent) and to increase confidence (36 per cent) were the main reasons respondents had chosen their courses.
  • Respondents found out about courses from a friend or relative (37 per cent), in the centre/school (26 per cent) and via a website (14 per cent); the results have remained in line with previous years.
  • Respondents were very positive about various aspects of the course or centre they attended. At least nine out of ten agreed, the tutor makes the subject interesting (97 per cent), they felt safe during the course’ (94 per cent) and the tutor understands their needs (93 per cent).
  • Nearly half of respondents (47 per cent) who did not undertake a ‘digital technology’ course reported they had used the technology to support their learning.
  • Since 2013, satisfaction levels have remained high and in the 2015, 96 per cent indicated they were satisfied with the overall adult learning experience.
  • The majority of respondents reported they had have used what they had learned at home/with their family (67 per cent). Around a third to move on to the next level course (35 per cent), in their community (33 per cent) and to improve knowledge or ability to get a job/develop their career (31 per cent).
  • The course had most influenced enjoying learning more (68 per cent), keeping their brain active (61 per cent) and having more self-confidence (61 per cent).
  • Around four out of ten respondents indicated they plan to they continue to study the subject at the current level (45 per cent) or they would go on to do a more advanced course (37 per cent).
  • Ninety-one per indicated they were satisfied with the advice and guidance they were given in relation to other courses, employment and voluntary opportunities.
Outcome
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